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SLLC LIT IN THE LOU posterWe are so excited by the amazing line-up we’ve got for our first annual LIT IN THE LOU Book Festival. We’ve got our program set, although there still might be a few tweaks! Please check it out here:

LIT IN THE LOU PROGRAM – 2014.
Please note that the schedule is a two-page spread, so that when you download the pdf, 
go to VIEW and select TWO PAGES UP to see the times.

Here’s how you can be involved:

  • Attend the Launch Party Friday night:
    • 7:30, 5th Floor of the University City City Hall building. We’ll hear from poets and politicians! And we’ll have music and appetizers from Racanellis and the first annual TRADITION OF LITERARY EXCELLENCE AWARD will be given to local literary lion William H. Gass.
  • ATTEND THE FREE READINGS AND WORKSHOPS ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY:  International bestselling and award-winning authors from our home town will be NOT ONLY reading, but participating in workshops and sharing their experiences with readers and writers like YOU. Don’t miss it! It is FREE.
  • SUPPORT LIT IN THE LOU by contributing to our IndieGoGo campaign so we can grow our book festival in the years to come!

Thanks to Reggie for passing along this poem from our new poet laureate:

Berryman

by W.S. Merwin
I will tell you what he told me
in the years just after the war
as we then called
the second world war

don’t lose your arrogance yet he said
you can do that when you’re older
lose it too soon and you may
merely replace it with vanity

just one time he suggested
changing the usual order
of the same words in a line of verse
why point out a thing twice

he suggested I pray to the Muse
get down on my knees and pray
right there in the corner and he
said he meant it literally

it was in the days before the beard
and the drink but he was deep
in tides of his own through which he sailed
chin sideways and head tilted like a tacking sloop

he was far older than the dates allowed for
much older than I was he was in his thirties
he snapped down his nose with an accent
I think he had affected in England

as for publishing he advised me
to paper my wall with rejection slips
his lips and the bones of his long fingers trembled
with the vehemence of his views about poetry

he said the great presence
that permitted everything and transmuted it
in poetry was passion
passion was genius and he praised movement and invention

I had hardly begun to read
I asked how can you ever be sure
that what you write is really
any good at all and he said you can’t

you can’t you can never be sure
you die without knowing
whether anything you wrote was any good
if you have to be sure don’t write

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